Tuesday, 3 February 2015

Why does this blog exist?

I teach overlocker (that's serger to our American friends) classes to the ladies of the Women's Institute. I've been sewing for years, and it's occured to me that in spite of the revival in sewing and the long term existence of overlockers, people are still, on the whole, terrified of them.

You buy an overlocker because everyone tells you it's the next step in sewing, you use it once or twice until you have to change the thread colour, and then it sits on your sewing table for months, if not years, gathering dust and taunting you. If you're really lucky you can put it back in its box in the back of the cupboard where it's tiny cries, craftily calculated to make you feel guilt towards your expensive and unloved purchase, can be ignored.

I use my overlocker regularly, but strictly in a change the thread colour to finish off the seams, kind of basic way.  It was only I was asked to be a last minute substitute teacher for an overlocking class that I really started to think of it in a different way. There is so much unharnessed potential in this little machine.

I know serger crafts are not a totally new idea, but they often involve some horribly ugly swing coat with "decorative" detail aimed a woman of a certain age and questionable taste. With the revival of sewing I want to take that a step further and encourage a new revival of the overlocker.

So here's my plan: To go where no woman has gone before and see how far I can push my overlocker to be useful. I freely admit now that some attempts would be better not to see the light of day, and some will be complicated, But I'm aiming to make projects that use a minimum of 80% sewing done on the overlocker, and see what I can discover. And if this blog inspires one or two of you to use your overlocker in a new way, then I'm happy.